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6 Scottish Beaches to Enjoy This Summer

Posted in General on Wednesday, 30 June 2021

Scotland’s beaches are among some of the best in the world, arguably rivalling the beaches you’ll find in the Maldives or Seychelles. Whether you’re visiting the east, west or north coast on your motorhome adventure, you’ll find pristine sands, undulating sand dunes and idyllic spots to lay out a picnic blanket. We’ve chosen 6 of the best Scottish beaches to enjoy this summer below – don’t forget the sunscreen!

Luskentyre beach, Isle of Harris

Luskentyre beach, Isle of Harris

Heading to the Outer Hebrides this summer? An absolute must-visit is Luskentyre beach, located on the west coast of South Harris. Featuring a stunning mountain backdrop, it’s one of the largest beaches on Harris and boasts miles of white sands and stunning turquoise waters – you’d be forgiven for thinking you were in Greece!

As it’s fairly remote you won’t find many leisure amenities here, however it’s the perfect place to enjoy a long walk on the 2.5-mile trail through the dunes or on the beach itself or cycle the single-track road that links the beach to Harris’s main highway.

Camusdarach beach, Arisaig

Camusdarach beach, Arisaig

Located on the old coast road between Morar and Arisaig is Camusdarach beach, filming location of classic 1983 film Local Hero starring Hollywood legend Burt Lancaster. Accessed by an effortless amble through low dunes is this stunning white sand beach, framed by a dramatic rocky backdrop with views to the outlying Isles of Rum and Eigg. The turquoise waters are somewhat chilly even during the summer months, so it’s more a beach for soaking up the sun rather than swimming. However, it’s the perfect location for rock pooling and picnicking and hikers can enjoy the nearby coastal paths.

Loch Morlich, Cairngorms

Loch Morlich, Cairngorms

If you enjoy an action-packed motorhome adventure, there’s plenty at Loch Morlich to keep you entertained. This freshwater loch near Aviemore also shows you don’t always have to head to the seaside for golden sands! During the high season, the Loch Morlich Watersports facility offers activities such as sailing, kayaking, windsurfing, canoeing and paddle boarding with equipment hire available. If you prefer less wet activities, mountain bikers can follow a challenging course through the surrounding Glenmore Forest, or hike the network of trails.

Sandwood Bay, Sutherland

Sandwood Bay, Sutherland

Regularly voted as one of Scotland’s most beautiful beaches is the remote, unspoilt Sandwood Bay. It’s definitely one for the avid walker, as it’s set at the end of a 4-mile footpath but the trek to reach it is truly worth the effort. At the end of the path awaits nearly 1.5 miles of pink sandy beach flanked by cliffs and to the south stands the impressive sea stack of Am Buachaille. Behind the bay’s large dunes sits Sandwood Loch, a freshwater loch full of brown trout. Reach Sandwood Bay by heading to the gravel car park at the hamlet of Blairmore.

Sango Bay, Durness

Sango Bay, Durness
Photo by Go Explore’s Senior Technician & Customer Service Manager David T, taken on his motorhome travels in 2020 One of the most northerly beaches in mainland Scotland is the beautifully formed cove, Sango Bay. It is truly spectacular, with golden sands, cliffs, sand dunes and rock formations and surrounded by some of Europe’s most isolated coastline. A short distance to the east of the beach is the famous Smoo Cave. The largest cave in Scotland, it was formed by both the sea and a river. Sango Bay is easily accessible from various car parks and above the beach is an excellent campsite and visitor centre, with the nearby village of Durness offering a few restaurants.

Yellowcraig Beach

Yellowcraig Beach
Popular East Lothian beach Yellowcraig has everything you need for the perfect family day out. A natural cove beach, it has stunning views to Fidra Island with its 1885 lighthouse, the inspiration behind Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island. Yellowcraig Beach is reached via a short walk from the adjacent car park (complete with toilets) through the dunes and offers a nature trail, barbecue site and network of footpaths known as the John Muir Way. The beach is popular with hikers, dog walkers and horse riders and even when busy, never feels packed owing to its width. Nearby picturesque village Dirleton has a castle with superb gardens and several pubs and restaurants.